Posts Categorized: Curriculum

As you may know, a number of people from a variety of wilderness training organization wrote a Scope of Practice (SOP) document in 2010 for Wilderness First Aid (WFA) courses.  The intent was to clearly articulate what we believe to be the intended audience of such a course and what a graduate of a 16 hour WFA should be trained…




We are pleased to announce the publication of the newly revised, spiral-bound Field Guide of Wilderness & Rescue Medicine and the fold-out Wilderness First Aid (WFA) Guide. Each reflects our understanding of current advances in the medicine utilized in wilderness and low-resource settings; while both retain their simplicity and practical utility.




Femur fractures are serious injuries that usually occur as the result of significant forces. A full assessment, focusing on critical system problems and their stabilization is the crucial first step.

Effective stabilization of femur injuries will help alleviate pain and decrease the possibility of complications. I believe that either a vacuum splint or good padding in a stable carrying device does a good job of providing both.

Although there is no literature supporting their efficacy in the prehospital setting, a commercial traction splint can be a useful tool when applied by a skilled practitioner who receives periodic training on a particular device and/or uses it during rescues or EMS calls. They should not be left on for a prolonged period of time (e.g., greater than 2 hours) unless limb neurovascular integrity and splint tension can be monitored properly and regularly.

Regardless, these are painful injuries. All require the administration of analgesics.




In order to establish guidelines for comprehensive, thorough, and more consistent wilderness medical training, AORE and other organizations that hold a respectively large place in the field of wilderness medicine have signed off on the Wilderness First Responder SOP (Draft), a document that complements the Wilderness First Aid Scope of Practice.

Please consider helping AORE make a difference by reviewing this document if you have ever sponsored a WFR course, attended at WFR course, or instructed a WFR course. Does this document include the topics that you want your staff to know? As a participants of a Wilderness First Responder course, is this training enough to prepare you for backcountry medical emergencies? Are the elective topics sufficient? Please be clear, professional, and thorough.




Looking to upgrade your Wilderness EMT?  How about taking the WEMT-I? Starting in May of 2010, Wilderness Medical Associates, the industry leader in wilderness medicine will begin offering the WEMT-Intermediate course.  This course is designed to expand the knowledge base and scope of currently certified Wilderness EMTs or EMTs. Wilderness EMT Course Content This course…




Is there a standard in wilderness medicine training? Authors of an editorial and article that appeared in the Wilderness and Environmental Medicine Journal earlier this year (Vol 20, 106 and 113-117) argued that there is no standard in wilderness medicine training for outdoor educators. In addition, they suggested that organizations offering this training have curricula…